About Us

GK picGabe A. Kwong, Ph.D.

Principal Investigator, Laboratory for Synthetic Immunity

Ph.D. Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology
B.S. Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley

gkwong@gatech.edu

Dr. Kwong is an Assistant Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech School of Engineering and Emory School of Medicine. His research program brings together advances from engineering and immunology in order to impact human health. His laboratory develops micro- and nanotechnologies that interact with the immune system – enabling new applications in biomedical diagnostics and cell-based therapies that address frontier challenges in cancer, transplantation medicine and infectious diseases. Dr. Kwong and his multidisciplinary team have published in major scientific journals such as Nature Biotechnology and Nature Medicine, leading to broad coverage including profiles in The Economist, NPR, BBC, and WGBH-2, Boston’s PBS station.

Dr. Kwong earned his B.S. in Bioengineering with Highest Honors from the University of California, Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the California Institute of Technology with Professor James R. Heath. He conducted postdoctoral studies in the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies (LMRT) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with Professor Sangeeta N. Bhatia. In recognition of his work, Dr. Kwong was named a "Future Leader in Cancer Research and Translational Medicine" by the Massachusetts General Hospital, and is the recipient of the NIH Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface, and the NIH Director's New Innovator Award. Dr. Kwong holds ten issued or pending patents in cancer nanotechnology, and has launched one biotechnology startup company.

 

Graduate Students

IMG_2104-2Shreyas Dahotre

B.S.E. Biomedical Engineering, Duke University

GT President's Fellow | NSF IGERT Trainee | NSF Graduate Fellow
shreyas.dahotre@gatech.edu

Shreyas grew up in Knoxville, TN and graduated from Duke University summa cum laude with a B.S.E. in Biomedical Engineering and a minor in Biology. As a Pratt Research Fellow at Duke, he worked in Dr. Jennifer West’s lab where he investigated (1) thermally responsive hydrogel-nanoshell composites for optically triggered drug delivery and (2) near-infrared irradiation of gold-silica nanoshells for siRNA transfection. His studies formed the basis for his undergraduate thesis that earned him Department Distinction. Currently, Shreyas is a graduate student at Georgia Tech/Emory in Biomedical Engineering where he is a NSF IGERT trainee, a Georgia Tech President’s Fellowship recipient, and a NSF GRFP awardee. In LSI, he is broadly interested in incorporating DNA nanotechnology for use in cell sorting and profiling applications. Outside of lab, Shreyas enjoys watching college sports, exploring Atlanta's food scene, and traveling. Go Vols and Blue Devils!


LSI-Website-Pic-1Ian Miller

B.S. Chemistry, Furman University

imiller7@gatech.edu

Ian hails from Massachusetts but is a global citizen, spending formative years in the Philippines as well as England. Ian attended Furman University and graduated magna cum laude with a B.S. in Chemistry. His studies were supported by selective scholarships, including the Furman Achiever, Keeler Chemistry and the Alden Pre Engineering Scholarships − the latter awarded to a single student per year. At Furman, Ian was selected as an NSF REU researcher and worked in Dr. Jeff Petty’s lab studying the interactions between silver nanoclusters and DNA for biosensing applications. Ian also worked for Dr. Tarek Shazly in the University of South Carolina’s Biomedical Engineering Department on an NSF RII-funded project where he examined the mechanical properties of tissue engineered blood vessel constructs and their native counterparts. Ian's current research is focused on engineering T cells for cancer immunotherapy. He is from Medford, MA and supports all Boston area sports teams, especially the New England Patriots.


QM Profile PicQuoc Mac

B.S. Chemistry, UNC at Chapel Hill

NSF Graduate Fellow
qmac@gatech.edu

Quoc grew up halfway around the world in Saigon, Vietnam. Due to his love for computer games, he studied Computer Science at the University of Science for two years before his family immigrated to the US and settled in North Carolina. Quoc then transferred to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he graduated with highest honors and highest distinction with a B.S. in Chemistry. There he worked in Dr. Qi Zhang’s lab and studied the dynamics of hammerhead ribozymes using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), showing that a lowly populated state is essential for their catalytic activity. For his research, Quoc was awarded the HHMI Future Scientists and Clinicians Fellowship, the Jason Altom Memorial Award for Undergraduate Research, and the Chancellor’s Venable Medal for Excellence in Chemistry. Currently, Quoc is a graduate student in BME where his research is focused on the broader applications of synthetic biomarkers for cancer and disease diagnosis. Quoc likes to spend his free time playing video games, watching sports, and traveling. He is a die-hard fan of the Tar Heels and the Red Devils.


dchangYun Min "Danny" Chang

B.S. Chemistry, University of Florida

danny.chang@emory.edu

Danny was born in Seoul, South Korea and immigrated to the US at the age of 9. He grew up in Tarpon Springs, FL and graduated summa cum laude with a B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Florida. As a University and HHMI Scholar, he worked in Dr. Weihong Tan's lab developing artificial-aptamer lipid receptors for cellular modification. He was later awarded the Pasteur-HHMI fellowship which allowed him to work at the Pasteur Institute in France. There, he worked under Dr. Oleg Melnyk to develop novel selenium-based linkers that facilitate native chemical ligation of peptides. For his senior year, he was awarded the prestigious HHMI EXROP and the HHMI Capstone fellowships to work with Dr. Stuart Schreiber at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. There he studied genomic biomarkers for rapamycin sensitivity in cancer cell lines and the efficacy of decitabine combination therapy in ovarian cancer. His undergraduate research studies culminated in 5 peer-reviewed publications. In recognition of his accomplishments, he was appointed as a J. Wayne Reitz Scholar and inducted into the UF Hall of Fame. After graduation, he worked as a post-baccalaureate fellow in Dr. William Gahl's lab at the NIH where he helped discover and characterize the mutation in the LAMA1 gene underlying the Poretti-Boltshauser Syndrome. This finding was later published on the cover of Journal of Medical Genetics. Currently, he is an MD/PhD student studying Immunology at Emory. He is jointly advised by Dr. Rafi Ahmed, director of the Emory Vaccine Center, developing novel therapies to modulate the differentiation of effector, memory, and exhausted T cells in the context of human cancers. Danny loves to travel, attend music festivals/concerts, and play golf in his free time. Go Gators!


018_modLena Gamboa

Sc.B. Biomedical Engineering, Brown University

GT President's Fellow | GTBioMAT Trainee | NSF Graduate Fellow
lena@gatech.edu

Lena grew up in Orlando, Florida (arguably the happiest place on earth) and graduated with honors from Brown University with an Sc.B. in Biomedical Engineering. At Brown, Lena worked in Dr. Ian Wong’s lab investigating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition by tracking and analyzing single-cell migration dynamics in 2D and 3D cancer co-cultures. She is a Questbridge Scholar and a recipient of the Karen T. Romer Undergraduate Teaching and Research Award, as well as Brown University’s School of Engineering George H. Main ’45 Award. Currently, she is a GTBioMAT trainee and a President’s Fellowship recipient in the joint Georgia Tech & Emory University BME Ph.D. program. Her research focuses on engineering T cells for cancer immunotherapy. Lena is dog-person, a life-long Orlando Magic fan, loves Beyoncé, and enjoys watching football, basketball, and volleyball. Go Magic!


Rotating Students

brandonBrandon Alexander Holt

B.S. Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

GT President's Fellow | GTBioMAT Trainee
brandon.holt@gatech.edu

Brandon grew up in Lawrenceville, GA, but often traveled to spend time with family in Sweden and Romania. He graduated from Georgia Tech summa cum laude with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering and a minor in Physics. As a Petit Research Scholar at GT, he worked in Dr. Todd Sulchek's lab where he engineered complement-modulating microparticles, which resulted in a first-author publication in Biomaterials Science. Additionally, with MSE student Shawn Gregory he developed an antimicrobial agent that can chelate to textiles to produce residual efficacy against multiple pathogens, around which they formed a startup. Currently, Brandon is a graduate student in BME where his research is focused on analyzing multiplexed protease signatures for disease prediction and diagnosis. Brandon spends his free time playing hockey, swimming, listening to M83, and enjoying time with his girlfriend and family.


Lab Technicians

OliviaOlivia Delmas

B.S. Molecular Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

olivia.delmas@bme.gatech.edu

Olivia is from Madison, Alabama, and went to school at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (go Blazers!). She graduated in April 2016 summa cum laude with a B.S. in molecular biology and a minor in chemistry. As an undergraduate, Olivia worked in Dr. Nicole Riddle’s epigenetics lab where she studied the role of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family in Drosophila melanogaster. She also worked for a summer internship in Dr. William Dynan’s lab at Emory University where she studied a novel DNA repair factor, called NONO, and its potential function as a biomarker for melanoma cancer. Currently, Olivia is the lab technician and assists the students with their various projects. In her free time, Olivia likes watching Netflix, reading books, and hanging out with friends, especially if they have pets.


 Undergraduate Students

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Joe Maenza

BME, Class of 2018
jmaenza3@gatech.edu

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Hassan Fakhoury

Petit Research Scholar
BME, Class of 2018
hfakhoury6@gatech.edu

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Jason Weis

Petit Research Scholar
BME, Class of 2018
jweis3@gatech.edu

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Claire Stoffers

BME, Class of 2018
cstoffers6@gatech.edu

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Justin Kahla

BME, Class of 2019
jkahla@gatech.edu

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Anna Romanov

Stamps President's Scholar
BME, Class of 2020
aromanov3@gatech.edu

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Lee-Kai Sun

BME, Class of 2020
sunleekai@gatech.edu

Collaborators

ahmed_largeRafi Ahmed

Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Emory University

Vaccine Center Director
Emory Vaccine Center

Website

Adams-AndrewAndrew Adams

Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery
Emory University School of Medicine

Website

405683James Dahlman

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University

Website

altman_croppedJohn Altman

Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Emory University

Principal Investigator
NIH Tetramer Core Facility

Website

Botchwey

Edward Botchwey

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University

Website

 

 

 

 

Alumni

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Samantha Stammen

BME, Class of 2018
sstammen3@gatech.edu

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Samantha Torres

Biochemistry, Class of 2019
storres31@gatech.edu

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Mukund Pandiri

BME, Class of 2020
mpandiri3@gatech.edu